LEARNING ABOUT MILK PAINT

 
 
A lot more people have heard about Milk Paint in the last little while thanks in a large part to the
internet and many DIY bloggers but Milk Paint has been around for thousands of years. Originally
 milk paint was made of milk, lime and earth pigments. Simple and easy for most households to
create and use. Over time the recipe has been improved upon using enhanced pigments and bonding
 agents but it is still used because it is simple, effective, and biodegradable.
 
 
I personally do not use it often. It comes in a powdered form and you must mix it yourself. I don't
 enjoy the really earthy smell and you must use up what you mix in a short amount of time. It does
 however offer a different look to painted furniture. It works well when applied to raw surfaces, but
 reacts in an unpredictable manor when applied to older finishes. It can crackle or flake off, and in my
 experience (which is limited to a handful of pieces) can continue to flake well after the paint is dry.
 
 
I used a little Sea Green Milk Paint as a base to achieve a great aged effect on this country cabinet
 I built. Below you can see the Sea Green is the darker flecks showing through the warn areas.

  
 
 
NOTE: This is a project done many years ago and before ASCP.
 
#1 Primed it in white
#2 Sprayed the Sea Green Milk paint
#3 Sprayed a turquoise tinted primer
 
 
The cabinet was waxed with a mix of walnut stain mixed with natural Minwax.
You could achieve the same look with dark wax I just didn't have any at the time.
 
 
All the distressing I did was done with sand paper between each coat of paint.
Doing it between each layer adds a great deal of depth to the finish but is extra work.
 
 
Here is some of that crackling I talked about earlier.
 
 
 
 
Milk Paint can be used very successfully
 but understanding how it works and behaves will help you succeed.
 
Locally you can get Milk Paint at Lee Valley approx. $14.00
 
 
 
 
 

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2 comments:

  1. So true about milk paint having been around for many years....thanks for the link to your source. I'm with you though it does have a different smell and will nit keep for very ling even in a jar with a tight lid...maybe a week. You amaze me with the pieces of furniture you build! I've shared many with my husband! Enjoy your week!

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  2. I adore seeing a lot of crackling and chipping on furniture that I paint. I usually use chalk paint which I love, but did try milk paint on a couple projects. It was a little more unpredictable, like you said, but liked it well enough. I LOVE the technique and patina you achieved on that hutch. Soooo beautiful!!

    xoxo laurie

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